Post-polio syndrome

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Post-polio syndrome (PPS, or post-poliomyelitis syndrome or post-polio sequelae) is a condition that affects polio survivors years after their recovery from an initial acute attack of the poliovirus.[1] It is characterized by new and progressive muscular weakness, pain, and fatigue that becomes apparent many years after the occurrence of acute paralytic or non-paralytic polio.[2]

Signs and symptoms[edit | edit source]

These include the following:[2][3]

  • Fatigue (both general and muscular)
  • Muscle weakness
  • Muscle pain
  • Gait disturbance
  • Respiratory problems
  • Swallowing problems (dysphagia)
  • Autonomic dysfunction
  • Sleep apnea
  • Flat-back syndrome

Incidence and prevalence[edit | edit source]

The exact incidence and prevalence of postpolio syndrome (PPS) is unknown and statistics vary. Medscape reports the incidence in previous acute polio patients ranges from approximately 22-68%.[2] The NIH estimates that the condition affects 25 to 40 percent of polio survivors.[1] In 1992, a study of former poliomyelitis patients from Allegheny County, Pennsylvania estimates 28.5% of all paralytic polio cases develop PPS.[4] Suggestions have been made that 100% of polio survivors, if tracked for a long period, can develop some symptoms of PPS.[2]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • In 1998 polio expert Richard Bruno, along with colleagues, reviewed the clinical findings in PPS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). They found significant parallels which suggested a possible common pathophysiology.[5]
  • In 2014 a Swedish clinician, using Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), compared the quality of life in 124 patients with PPS and 100 patients with ME/CFS. Results indicated that both groups have lower quality of life than Swedish controls, and that ME/CFS patients had a lower quality of life compared with PPS patients.[6]
  • A study in 2019, using the self-reporting questionnaires, DePaul Symptom Questionnaire 2 (DSQ-2) and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), found that participants with ME/CFS were more functionally impaired across symptoms than those with PPS.[7] Additionally, the study found that the three domains that most commonly differentiated ME/CFS from PPS were neurocognitive, post-exertional malaise, and neuroendocrine.[7]

Research studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1998, Parallels between post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?[5] - (Abstract)
  • 2014, Comparison of quality of life in patients with post-polio syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with Swedish norm[6] - (Abstract)
  • 2019, Differentiating post-polio syndrome from myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome[7] - (Abstract)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Post-Polio Syndrome Fact Sheet | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke". www.ninds.nih.gov. Retrieved Jan 16, 2020. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.3 "Postpolio Syndrome: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology". Nov 14, 2019. 
  3. "Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke". www.ninds.nih.gov. Retrieved Jan 16, 2020. 
  4. Ramlow, J.; Alexander, M.; LaPorte, R.; Kaufmann, C.; Kuller, L. (Oct 1, 1992). "Epidemiology of the Post-Polio Syndrome". American Journal of Epidemiology. 136 (7): 769–786. doi:10.1093/aje/136.7.769. ISSN 0002-9262. 
  5. 5.05.1 Bruno, Richard L; Creange, Susan J; Frick, Nancy M (Sep 28, 1998). "Parallels between post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?". The American Journal of Medicine. 105 (3, Supplement 1): 66S–73S. doi:10.1016/S0002-9343(98)00161-2. ISSN 0002-9343. 
  6. 6.06.1 Östlund, G. (May 2014). "Comparison of quality of life in patients with post-polio syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with Swedish norm". Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. 57: e99. doi:10.1016/j.rehab.2014.03.340. 
  7. 7.07.17.2 Klebek, Lauren; Sunnquist, Madison; Jason, Leonard A. (Oct 2, 2019). "Differentiating post-polio syndrome from myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome". Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior. 7 (4): 196–206. doi:10.1080/21641846.2019.1687117. ISSN 2164-1846. 

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.