Jay Goldstein

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Dr. Jay A. Goldstein was a prominent ME/CFS clinician and researcher located in southern California, USA. Trained as a psychiatrist, he taught at the University of California, Irvine. He was director of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Institutes of Anaheim Hills and Beverly Hills. He organized a symposium in Los Angeles on CFIDS and fibromyalgia. When Stephen Straus, in 1989, published that CFS was likely a psychiatric illness, Jay Goldstein vehemently criticized Straus's work, saying "To be quite frank, I could not believe a research paper could be this bad and be published."[1]

Books[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1995, The Assessment of Vascular Abnormalities in Late Life Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Brain SPECT: Comparison with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder[4](Abstract)
  • 2000, The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Related Neurosomatic Disorders[5]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Johnson, Hillary (2006). Osler's Web (2nd ed.). iUniverse, Inc. 
  2. Goldstein, Jay A. (1993). Chronic Fatigue Syndromes: The Limbic Hypothesis. Haworth Medical Press. ISBN 978-1-56024-433-2. 
  3. Goldstein, Jay A. (2004). Tuning the Brain: Principles and Practice of Neurosomatic Medicine. Haworth Press. ISBN 978-0-7890-2246-2. 
  4. Goldstein, Jay A.; Mena, Ismael; Jouanne, Eugenio; Lesser, Ira (1995), "The Assessment of Vascular Abnormalities in Late Life Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Brain SPECT: Comparison with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 1 (1): 55-79, doi:10.1300/J092v01n01_05 
  5. Jay A. Goldstein. (2000). The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Related Neurosomatic Disorders. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, pp. 83-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v06n02_09

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.